Dental Care During Pregnancy

While being pregnant can be such a rewarding time for a woman, it also brings a lot of changes. Many first-time mothers are unaware of just how many changes pregnancy can bring. Did you know that pregnancy can affect your dental health? As long as you’re aware of the changes and how to tackle your dental hygiene routine during pregnancy, you will have no issues and can rest easy where your oral health is concerned.

Hormones

It’s common knowledge that a woman’s hormones go a little crazy when she’s pregnant. This is often the root cause for many of the changes in women during pregnancy. It’s definitely one of the main root issues when dental problems start to arise for pregnant women. For example, a rise or fluctuation in hormone levels can cause a woman’s gums to swell, become redder, and bleed. This in turn causes food particles to get caught, resulting in gum disease or infection. If left unchecked or treated, this can get out of hand and become severe, causing a fair amount of dental work to counteract it.

Regular Dental Visits

Preventive visits are encouraged for everyone, including pregnant women. Just as you would go to a doctor for regular checkups while pregnant, it’s encouraged that the same is done with your dentist while pregnant as well. As mentioned above, pregnant women experience many changes in their health and this can affect their dental health as well. It’s strongly encouraged that a pregnant woman have regular checkups and observe preventative treatment in order to ensure her oral health remain in line. This can save a pregnant patient time and money down the road just in case her pregnancy causes any major dental issues.

Only Do What is Necessary

It’s suggested that all dental work be done before the third trimester. This is because a pregnant woman can run into difficulties while laying flat on her back at this point in the pregnancy. In general, any dental work that isn’t absolutely necessary should be skipped until the pregnancy is over. Procedures or treatments such as fillings or other preventative procedures are often a good idea since they will reduce the risk of infection which can be tough on a pregnant woman if it occurs. However, if any major work isn’t absolutely necessary, especially if it’s after the second trimester, it should be put on hold until after the baby is born.

As always, speak with your dental professional about your options. They will be able to guide you on your oral health journey during your pregnancy. Each woman is different and will run into different circumstances which means it’s important that your health is monitored and customized to your situation.

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