Successful Treatments for Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease can be quite common among Americans. Depending on the severity of the disease, this will determine what treatment your dentist will suggest. There are various successful treatments for periodontal disease that are both non-surgical or surgical. Of course, your dentist will always suggest non-surgical options first since these are better for patients and considered non-invasive. However, depending on the circumstances, non-surgical options may not be possible. Read on to find out more details about the suggestions your dentist may offer you.

Scaling and Root Planing

This is one of the number one non-surgical treatments for periodontal disease. This is done in the dentist chair, same-day, and has very little pain associated with it. This procedure involves cleaning and smoothing the roots of the teeth as well as removing any built-up materials on the teeth themselves. Underneath the gum is cleaned which allows the gums to heal and reattach to the teeth.

Antibiotics

Sometimes, depending on the circumstances, doing a round of antibiotics can fix the issue. This, of course, is a non-surgical option. This can be administered through a topical or oral form and helps to reduce infection and further spreading of the periodontal disease.

Flap Surgery

This is a surgical process that allows a dentist to cut into the gum and get a better look at the roots of the affected teeth. Since periodontal disease can reach into the bones of the face, this also allows a dentist to contour any bone that may need it.

Soft Tissue Grafts

Periodontal disease loosens the gums, causing them to recede, pull away from the teeth, swell, and bleed. Due to this receding, a soft tissue graft may be needed to reinforce the gumline. This is a surgical procedure that allows the appearance of teeth to be improved as well as stop further receding. The tissue is taken from the palate or from another donor source.

Bone Grafting

As mentioned, periodontal disease can eat away at the bones surrounding your teeth. If this occurs, a bone graft may be needed in order for the tooth to be held in place and not lost. This is a surgical procedure that usually involves pieces of your own bones, synthetic materials, or bone from donors.

Stimulating Bone or Tissue Growth

In some cases, a dentist may use a special protein gel that contains the proteins in your body that naturally encourage tissue growth, bone growth, and enamel. This is applied to the root of the tooth which makes it a surgical procedure. Another guided growth technique involves a dentist placing a special material in the area affected which bars any tissue filling in the area in order for bone to grow instead. This is also a surgical procedure and helps fix areas where periodontal disease has eaten away at the bone.

Periodontal disease can be serious and it’s better to catch it at an earlier stage. If you feel that you might be struggling with periodontal disease, give your dentist a call.

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